[Camelot Logo]

CAMELOT THERAPEUTIC HORSEMANSHIP
Horsemanship for Children and Adults with Disabilities

• HOME   • CALENDAR   • PROGRAM   • PONY BANK   • HELP   •FACILITY  
• FAQ'S   • HORSES   • PEOPLE   • CONTACTS   • LINKS   • RIDE   • VOLUNTEER  

FAQ

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS




• WHAT IS CAMELOT'S MISSION AND PURPOSE?

• HOW WAS CAMELOT FOUNDED?

• WHO CAN PARTICIPATE IN CAMELOT'S PROGRAM?

• HOW MANY PEOPLE DO YOU SERVE?

• HOW MUCH DOES IT COST TO PARTICIPATE?

• HOW IS CAMELOT FINANCIALLY SUPPORTED?

• HOW DO PROSPECTIVE STUDENTS FIND CAMELOT?

• WHAT IS AN ACCESSIBLE FACILITY? WHY IS CAMELOT UNIQUE?

• CAN I COME VISIT THE FACILITY?

• DOES CAMELOT TAKE DONATED HORSES?

• HOW CAN I VOLUNTEER?

• HOW CAN I HELP CAMELOT?

• I WANT TO START MY OWN CAMELOT, WHAT DO I DO? AND WHAT IS YOUR INTERNSHIP PROGRAM ABOUT?



[photo of Cayanna asking a student for food. Sign says, please don't feed the horses!]

What Is Camelot's MISSION and purpose?

Our mission is to improve the quality of life for children and adults with disabilities through programs of horsemanship and outdoor education that develop self-worth, independence and active participation in the community.

Camelot is a multifaceted program that requires tremendous courage and commitment from each student. When the student comes to Camelot, they have said to themselves, "I am ready to manage my own life, I am ready to join the mainstream."

The purpose of all our efforts, program and services at Camelot is to empower children and adults with disabilities to dream and to set goals. We teach this by example. Fulfilling Camelot's dream of acquiring our own land and facilities sends the message loud and clear - impossible things do happen!

BACK TO TOP

How Was Camelot Founded?

Camelot began in 1980 and was incorporated as a non-profit, charitable organization (501 c3) in 1983. Eileen Szychowski (pronounced Sha-huski) is the founder of Camelot, a horsemanship and outdoor education program for children and adults with physical disabilities. The program has served people in the greater Phoenix area for the past 22 years, offering curriculum that is educational, therapeutic and vocational, with emphasis on mainstreaming into the community. Camelot is the offspring of a similar program in California called The Dragon Slayers, founded and directed by Josef Rivers. Eileen, who is a disabled equestrian herself, trained there for seven years.

In 1998 Camelot completed its new and permanent facility, on 14.5 acres of land in north Scottsdale. The barrier-free barn is a prototype in that it provides physically challenged students with a safe environment that encourages independence. As far as we know, no other barn like it exists.

BACK TO TOP

Who Can Participate In Camelot's Program?

Camelot serves physically disabled, mentally alert persons who are seven years of age or older. Both children and adults participate in the program. If you are interested in becoming a student, please call us at (480) 515-1542, or email us.

BACK TO TOP

How Many People Do You Serve?

Instructors teach approximately 20 to 30 riders per week on an individual basis and the program serves several hundred persons annually through its riding program, field trips and disability awareness training programs. We also have a carriage driving alternative for those who are medically unable to ride on horseback, so they can have a comparable horse experience.

BACK TO TOP

How Much Does It Cost To Participate?

No fees are charged to those we serve, because we believe freedom and dignity cannot be assigned a dollar value. Rather, students are expected to pass on what they learn and experience by becoming contributing members of the community through volunteer efforts, school/work re-entry or by assisting other Camelot students.

BACK TO TOP


How is Camelot Financially Supported?

Camelot exists solely on donations. All funding comes from private donations, grants, corporate sponsorships, service clubs and benefits. There is no funding from government sources. All funds are retained locally and all donations are tax-deductible according to the IRS, under Section 501 c3. We appreciate any financial contribution, large or small. You can become a Champion of the Round Table, or if you'd rather, call us at (480) 515-1542 or email us.

Camelot opens their barn doors to the community every March to celebrate HOOVES & HEROES, our annual Not-So-Silent Auction & Raffle! There is always wonderful music, great food and fun for the whole family! For more information about this event, as well as other events that help support Camelot, please visit Camelot's Ranch News.

BACK TO TOP

How do prospective students find Camelot?

Students find us through our website, by word of mouth, or through referrals from teachers, doctors, therapists, social workers and counselors. If you are interested in becoming a student, please contact us at (480) 515-1542 or email us.

BACK TO TOP

What Is An Accessible Facility? Why Is Camelot Unique?

Our barn, office, training area, classroom, kitchen and even our bathrooms and shower are all wheelchair accessible. We have Braille signage throughout the barn and tack room. The aisles are clear and pathways are open. We are unique in that we can accommodate a variety of physical conditions that include visual, hearing and mobility limitations. To see pictures of the facility, please click on the FACILITY link.

BACK TO TOP

Can I Come Visit The Facility?

Camelot is a training facility, and we take our responsibility to our students very seriously. We will be happy to give you a tour, but we do not schedule visits during student time in order to ensure privacy and maintain safety during a lesson. To inquire about a tour, please call us at (480) 515-1542, or send us an email..

BACK TO TOP

Does Camelot Take Donated Horses?

Camelot’s horses are part of our training team, and, as such, have to meet very specific requirements. Our experience has been that we need to recruit horses with the same screening process and selectivity that we apply to our human instructors. Currently, our barn is fully staffed with equine instructors.

BACK TO TOP

How Can I Volunteer?

We are always looking for Ranch Hands, Instructional Assistants and groundskeepers. Other possibilities open periodically. To volunteer, visit our ranch hand or instructional assistant pages to learn more and download an application packet, or contact Michelle Harrison, our director of community relations, via email to request a volunteer packet. We ask that you make a minimum six-month commitment, and volunteers generally spend four hours, once a week, at the ranch.

BACK TO TOP

How Can I Help Camelot?

In addition to volunteering , we also appreciate financial donations, since we exist completely on the generosity of the community. If you are interested in becoming a supporter, please visit our page on becoming a CHAMPION OF THE ROUND TABLE, and be sure to take a look at our wish list for our current needs. For more information, please call us at (480) 515-1542 or email us.

BACK TO TOP

I Want To Start My Own Camelot, What Do I Do?

We are thrilled to be considered a model in this type of horsemanship program, and would encourage anyone interested to find out more about creating and operating a facility of their own. In preparation for your own facility, you or someone on your committee should have at least two year's experience in the following areas:

* working with people with special needs
* teaching and curriculum planning
* supervising and encouraging volunteers
* first aid and CPR
* barn management and equine health
* business management, budgeting, bookkeeping

This is a career for which you have to prepare yourself. We've included some sources for additional information on our
LINKS page. We also offer an INTERNSHIP annually for qualified candidates.


|BACK TO TOP|

| HOME | CALENDAR | PROGRAM | PONY BANK | HELP | FACILITY|
| FAQ'S | HORSES | PEOPLE CONTACTS | LINKS | RIDE | VOLUNTEER |

Copyright © 2008, Camelot Therapeutic Horsemanship, Inc. All rights reserved.
Web design by Michelle Harrison. Majority of the photography is by Mary Hadsall.